Kevin Hai


Projects —
  1. Cycladic Cliffhanger
  2. Five Opportunities for Planetary Acupuncture 
  3. Knowledge City
  4. (Pool)House
  5. Bibliotech Intersect
  6. Pier2Peer
  7. Tiltshift Terminal
  8. Greenpoint Theatre
  9. Rave New World — Amsterdam
  10. Inside/Out

Studies —
  1. Teeny, Weeny, Santorini
  2. Rave New World — Berlin
  3. Section Qualities
  4. Places of Internet of Things
  5. The Birds and the Bees
  6. Typesetting Scenes
  7. The Glitch in the System
  8. Pop Rocks

Writings —
  1. Welcome to the Gayborhood
  2. What a Tangled Web We Weave
  3. The Expanded Field
  4. Le Corbusier in Algeria
  5. Machinations of Power
  6. Going Dutch


Kevin Hai —
  1. He is a designer.
  2. He is currently located in New York City, New York.
  3. He has worked previously at firms in the United States and Europe, wrote his thesis in Amsterdam, assisted artists in Paris, and is currently doing research on Berlin.
  4. He is interested in the subversive in/and the sublime.
  5. He does other things too. →

Mark




Inside/Out





Spring 2015
Critics : Jason Logan, Josh Robbins (LOJO)
AIA Houston Design Award
Featured in Cite Magazine

Inside/Out is simultaneously an exhibition about Houston’s Fifth Ward community and a structure-in-waiting. The title describes both the way in which the design research is organized and the way in which the built structure will function once it is re-constructed within an existing building – supporting a dilapidated shotgun storehouse from the “inside-out”. The exhibition is a cross-disciplinary effort between the Interior Architecture program (INAR) and the Community Design Resource Center (CDRC) at the University of Houston, in collaboration with numerous community partners and stakeholders. The exhibition showcases research developed during the Collaborative CommunityDesign Initiative, an effort organized by the University of Houston’s CDRC in 2013-2014.

Working with community partner Olivet Missionary Baptist Church in the Fifth Ward, the INAR 3501 spring studio considered the adaptive re-use of a “shotgun” storehouse into a public reading room and e-resource center. A final design scheme was selected by the client and critics. The design was chosen for its simplicity and legibility as a structural, formal and spatial interior structure that allowed for a variety of programs. Studiomates had differents tasks assigned to them as the studio transitioned to a collective design development effort. In the final four weeks of the semester, students began to fabricate all of the components for the interior structure in the University of Houston’s Keeland Design Center. The resulting structure is the product of parametric design investigations, structural studies, spatial research, digital and analog fabrication methods, and teamwork.








         






haikevin@columbia.edu